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UK wildlife charity, Wildscreen releases new endangered species gaming app to inspire the conservationists of tomorrow

The battle for survival goes mobile 

UK-based wildlife charity Wildscreen has today released 'Survival', a free quick-fire mobile game to raise awareness amongst young people about the world's most endangered animals.

Immersive, interactive and educational, 'Survival' is a great way to encourage children's curiosity for the natural world. At home, in the classroom or on-the-go kids will have a whale of a time as they race against the clock to tap, pinch, drag, scroll and swipe their way through a series of mini-games whilst learning about the world's endangered species.

Wildscreen works to promote a greater public appreciation of the world's biodiversity and the conservation of nature, through the power of wildlife imagery. Wildscreen's flagship initiative, ARKive is a unique online collection of the very best films and photographs of the world's wildlife, providing a stunning audio-visual record of life on Earth, freely accessible to all at http://www.arkive.org.

By bringing the natural world to young people on the platforms in which they are most comfortable and familiar, Wildscreen hopes to entertain, and educate the next generation of conservationists.

"What a brilliant idea! It's a fun way to learn about endangered species - though I have to admit I was too slow to beat my eight-year-old goddaughter." Mark Carwardine, Zoologist and wildlife TV presenter.

Richard Edwards, Wildscreen Chief Executive, said: "Wildscreen's mission is to use the power of wildlife imagery to inspire us all to appreciate, value and protect our natural world. We are always exploring new and innovative ways of reaching greater audiences, and by launching the Survival gaming app, on both iOS and Android platforms, we're looking to reach the younger generation and inspire the conservationists and environmental stewards of tomorrow."

And the learning doesn't stop there. Children are encouraged to continue their learning journeys on the ARKive website, which is packed full of over 14,000 multimedia species profiles containing fascinating animal and plant fact files, over 90,000 photos and videos and engaging and fun educational activities and resources for all ages.

Survival is available for free now on the App store and Android Market.

Download 'Survival' on iPhone, iPod touch or iPad http://itunes.apple.com/app/survival/id467062222?ign-mpt=uo%3D6&mt=8

Download 'Survival' on Android handsets or tablets https://market.android.com/details?id=survival.endangeredanimalgame

Find out more about 'Survival' at: www.arkive.org/apps/survival or watch the 'Survival' promotional video on YouTube.

Ends

Notes to editors:
For further information, or for an interview with Richard Edwards, Chief Executive of Wildscreen, please contact:

Lucie Muir, ARKive Research Manager
Telephone: 0117 328 5959
Email: lucie.muir@wildscreen.org.uk

For high resolution images, please contact: lucie.muir@wildscreen.org.uk

About Wildscreen:
A UK registered charity, Wildscreen (http://www.wildscreen.org), works to promote a greater public appreciation of the world's biodiversity and the conservation of nature, through the power of wildlife imagery.

Wildscreen brings together the world's leading filmmakers and photographers, as well as conservationists, scientists, educators and members of the public from across the globe to inspire a greater interest in the world's wildlife, raise awareness about the threats facing our planet's biodiversity and encourage conservation of the natural world.

Wildscreen's patrons include some of the world's greatest environmental icons, including: HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh; Sir David Attenborough; Dr Sylvia Earle; and Professor E.O. Wilson.

Wildscreen's programme of interrelated events and outreach activities includes:

ARKive: A unique online collection of the very best films and photographs of the world's wildlife, providing a stunning audio-visual record of life on Earth, freely accessible to all at http://www.arkive.org.

Sir David Attenborough, Wildscreen Patron says, "ARKive is an extraordinary educational resource and it can be the most powerful instrument in conservation.

"Wildlife images are without doubt one of the most powerful ways of engaging people with the natural world. This has become increasingly important as more and more of us live in cities, cut off from that world. Only when you see what these wonderful species look like can you really begin to care about them."

Wildscreen Festival: Internationally acknowledged as the world's largest and most prestigious wildlife and environmental film festival. The Wildscreen Festival is held biennially in Bristol, UK and offers a week-long programme of 150 workshops and seminars for professional filmmakers, and is attended by 550 delegates from 42 countries. The Festival also offers a number of free public film screenings and talks, attracting more than 2,750 members of the public. http://www.wildscreenfestival.org

WildPhotos: The UK's leading nature photography symposium, exploring the power of wildlife and environmental photography. WildPhotos draws the biggest names in nature photography from across the globe and is attended by professional photographers, industry enthusiasts and amateur photographers. http://www.wildphotos.org.uk

Wildscreen Outreach: A touring programme of award-winning film screenings and masterclasses to reach, engage and inspire new audiences. Programmes in developing countries and emerging markets, where pressure on the environment is most critical, are a key priority. In the past five years, the programme has taken place in India, Sri Lanka, Mexico, China and Taiwan. www.wildscreen.org.uk/initiatives-outreach

WildFilmHistory: An online guide to the pioneering people and productions behind 100 years of natural history filmmaking. http://www.wildfilmhistory.org

Survival was designed, built and released into the wild by Bristol-based creative agency Thought Den.

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